Race, Power, and Inequities

At a Glance

Breast cancer incidence is not distributed equally among different ethnic or racial communities or groups, due to a number of complex, often interrelated factors.

For example, Black women are twice as likely as White women to be diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer, a more aggressive subtype of the disease.

Race and ethnicity have complex relationships with socio-economic status in the U.S., and both factors are related to breast cancer risk.

Science Summary

Breast cancer incidence is not distributed equally among different ethnic or racial communities or groups, due to a number of complex, often interrelated factors. For example, Black women are twice as likely as White women to be diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer, a more aggressive subtype of the disease. In addition, elevated risk among some groups may be misrepresented, such as when rates are reported as lower for all women of Asian and Pacific Islander descent, ignoring potentially elevated breast cancer risk among young Japanese and Filipina women. Read More

Intervention

Overarching Goal: Build power and create accountability to address the historical roots and ongoing trauma of discrimination and systemic oppression based on race, ethnicity, income status, gender identity and orientation,
sexual orientation, immigration status, disability, or other factors that may increase breast cancer risk. Read More

 

“Reducing breast cancer risk is only one aspect of the overall goal of ending racism and other oppressions, yet breast cancer prevention provides an additional lens in support of these societal struggles.” –Paths to Prevention: CA’s Breast Cancer Primary Prevention Plan  

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